Release 73:  April 1, 2014

Case Management Worker Guide #1 -
Case Management Examples


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  1. Generic case management

    Case management consists of these elements. (Eligibility items are italicized.)

    Screening and Assessment to obtain basic information for case management and eligibility purposes.

    This includes the following steps:

    Possible questions or statements to gather information about client circumstances.

    Remember: the decision maker is the client.

    This may be a good opportunity to discuss release of information issues with the client and have them sign the Authorization for Use and Disclosure of Information (MSC 2099) if they agree.

    Staffing is consulting or meeting with partners regarding clients' service needs to assist in making joint plans. Before inviting partners or sharing information, obtain the clients' consent. Staffing could mean:

    Brokering is guiding clients to appropriate community resources and doing followup to determine effectiveness.

    This includes:

    Resources are used or developed to meet client needs.

    This means:

    Development of Plan


  2. Determining the appropriate focal point of case management

    Keep in mind that family members may need more than one focal point of case management.

    WORK STATUS

    Ready to work

    Identifiers: Good recent work history. Job losses are not client caused. There are no family or medical problems needing resolution. There are no issues that would interfere with employment. Any issues that need to be resolved can be done in off work hours.

    Almost ready to work

    Identifiers: No recent job history or job losses that may be client caused. Medical problems exist that need to be dealt with prior to employment. There are family problems that cannot be dealt with in off-work hours.

    Working: Retention/wage enhancement

    Identifiers: Client begins job, but has issues they are still working on. Includes clients moving to employment after TANF, clients in the Post-TANF Program, Refugee benefits or Pre-TANF Program ends. Client is working part time, and needs help finding full-time employment. Client wants to get a better paying job. Client needs skill building training or education to promote at current job or get a better job.

    Child care

    Identifiers: Clients who are working or in JOBS activities, who need care for children under 13 or children under age 18 with special needs.

    TEENS

    Teen parent

    Identifiers: Parents who are age 19 or younger.

    Teens (nonpregnant) on OHP or OHP/SNAP not living with parents/relatives

    Identifiers: Teen lives with friends, is homeless or is living on their own.

    FAMILY ISSUES

    Domestic violence issues

    Identifiers: A response to the application item #5 or #6 indicating domestic violence. This could also be indicated on the Cooperating with Child Support Enforcement (DHS 428A), DCS good cause form and DHS 7823. Client may self-identify as a victim of domestic violence. The case manager observes or becomes aware of hypervigilance; explanation of injuries inconsistent with type/location of injury; substance abuse; frequent headaches; multiple injuries; gastrointestinal problems; eating and sleeping disorders; depression/suicidal ideation/high anxiety; sexual assault/rape.

    Client comes to appointments with injuries. Comes to appointments late, needs to leave early, is secretive about home life. There is frequent absenteeism due to medical problems or concerns about children. Client is excessively emotional, tearful, angry, depressed, nervous or confused. Client has low energy, fatigue and has trouble making decisions. Does not feel confident making any big decisions without partner, and will not make appointments without partner. Partner shows up frequently at client's JOBS activity site.

    Alcohol and Drug (A&D) issues

    Identifiers: Client always blames others for the problems in his/her life. Questionable job losses. Others in family are alcoholics or drug abusers. Job losses have occurred due to excessive absence. There is pattern of accidents on the job. Client has had DUIs. There are observable mood swings, dilated pupils, needle marks, the smell of alcohol, hyperactivity, difficulty staying on track or dramatic attention getting. The client has short-term memory loss and/or blackouts. The client may have an infectious disease such as TB, HIV, STDs, urinary tract infections, pneumococcal and other pneumonias, hepatitis B and C and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

    Housing issues

    Identifiers: A response on the application in the Emergent Need section regarding needing a place to live, monthly rent and utility payments being more than monthly income or responses that indicate a pending eviction or utility shut-off notice may indicate a need for support around housing issues. Housing issues may also come up during other client contacts, including the screening process using the DHS 7823; case management/JOBS interviews; conciliation appointments; as well as appointments with contractors or other community partners.

    Health issues (physical disabilities, mental health, intellectual functioning)

    Physical health identifiers: Clients who state they cannot work and/or offer a doctor's statement to that effect. Clients with observable medical problems.

    Mental health identifiers: Client's affect is inconsistent with the situation. Frequent visits to hospital emergency rooms. Appearance, attire and hygiene are less than socially acceptable. Client seems disorganized, confused or sleeps excessively. Chronic lack of follow-through and inability to get along with others. Pattern of noncompliance with case plan activities.

    Intellectual functioning disabilities identifiers:

    Learning disability:  Client has been in special classes. Reverses letters/figures when filling out agency forms. Low level of literacy as observed on application.

    Marginal intelligence:  Client has been in special classes. Client has frequent job losses which may be due to being too slow. Client has difficulty with abstract thinking.

    Pregnant women/women with infants

    Identifiers: Self identification.

    Youth/child issues (juvenile justice, education, abuse/neglect)

    Identifiers: The family is involved with Child Welfare and/or the juvenile court. The child(ren) has poor grades, behavior problems at school, is in special classes or is suspended from school. The parents are called to the school frequently to deal with the child's problems. Observable abuse or neglect. The family is receiving treatment/counseling from a community mental health or child welfare agency.

    Children living with adults who are not receiving cash benefits

    Identifiers: Relatives (non-needy caretaker relatives) raising their grandchildren, nieces and nephews or cousins. Families in which one or more of the adults are noncitizens.

    Noncustodial parent

    Identifiers: As identified by DCS, custodial parent or relatives of children. Teen girl living with a male.


  3. Work status focal point; ready to work

    Principle-based decision

    Work is better than welfare.

    F SEE WORK STATUS FOCAL POINT; CHILD CARE, IN THIS WORKER GUIDE (CM-WG#1.6).

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Legal considerations

    If the client does not have a driver's license, but does drive for doing job search, explore ways of helping the client get a driver's license or explore alternative means of transportation.

    If the client has legal problems such as the need to do community service, fines, or is on probation, these will need to be taken into consideration in planning the job search.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    Clients who have recovered from A&D problems must not be referred to jobs providing access to alcohol or drugs.

    Narrative/Data entry

    Coding for CMS: Work status.

    Coding for TRACS: Enter PE, other activity codes and attendance on TRACS.

    Coding for FSMIS: Work status.

    Narrate: Employment goal, date of case plan, review dates, arrangements for transportation and child care, support service payments, progress towards goals.

    Eligibility

    Support services payments may be issued during the Pre-TANF Program prior to final determination of eligibility.

    Principle-based outcome

    Clients become employed as quickly as possible.


  4. Work status focal point; almost ready to work

    Principle-based decision

    Work is better than welfare. Some clients need employment preparation activities and/or resolution of personal/family issues in addition to, or before seeking employment.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Legal considerations

    Same as for Ready-to-Work.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    Same as for Ready-to-Work.

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: Work status.

    Coding on TRACS: Enter activities on TRACS, update attendance.

    Coding on FSMIS: Work status.

    Narrate: Arrangements for transportation and child care, support service payments, progress towards goals.

    Principle-based outcome

    Clients, who have received job preparation services and who have resolved personal/family issues become employed as quickly as possible.


  5. Work status focal point; retention and wage enhancement

    Principle-based decision

    Working clients will remain employed at the same job or will obtain a better paying job.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on TRACS:

    Eligibility

    F FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE OAR 461-190-0211.

    Principle-based outcome

    Employed clients who receive services to help them retain their first job increase their income through working more hours, promoting, or getting a better job.


  6. Work status focal point; child care

    Principle-based decision

    When clients are working or participating in the JOBS program, their children are in safe, stable and dependable child care that supports the child's development. Clients and child care providers understand the payment system. Clients understand the need to pay the provider the copay, and providers are paid promptly.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    DHS:   Child Care Need Statement for Older Children (DHS 7484), Parent Guide to Child Care (DHS 7478), Special Need Child Care Rate Request (DHS 7486), Child Care Provider Guide (DHS 7492), Child Care Provider Listing and Provider Information Sheet (DHS 7494) and Child Care Provider Letter (DHS 7494E);

    Certificate of Immunization Status:   Available from the county health department for use by providers to record children's immunizations;

      Managing the Cost of Quality Child Care and Making Good Child Care Choices (brochures of the Child Care Division, Employment Department).

    Legal considerations

    Child care providers must report child abuse to DHS. Providers must keep immunization records for children in care;

    State law requires children in child care facilities to be immunized or in the process of completing their immunizations;

    Confidentiality rules allow DHS staff to give information to child care providers limited to these items: case number and program of client, amount agency will pay, copay amount and reason for delay in agency's paying bill;

    Child care providers, unless they are exempt, must be registered with or licensed by the Child Care Division;

    The client, not DHS, is the employer of the child care provider. However, DHS is required to report payments of more than $600 in one year to the IRS.

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: For ERDC, enter work hours in CC Wrk Hrs and the number in the ERDC household in # ERDC. Entry in these fields generates the CCB if the listing information is on the system.
    Coding on FSMIS: Use code CC for dependent care for working clients and enter the ERDC copay and child care cost above the DHS rate.
    Coding on WSIT: Enter data in the WSIT screen to generate a JCCB.
    Narrate: Narrate name, address, phone number of child care providers and which one is the primary provider. If a special rate is being paid, narrate the basis for the rate.

    Eligibility

    Use prospective budgeting to determine income amount for ERDC. Use the JCCB for JOBS participants when the provider is listed.

    The agency will not continue to pay for child care if the client fails to pay the copay to the provider.

    The child care provider cannot be under age 18; on the same TANF grant as the child in care; a sibling under age 18 who lives with the child; a parent/step-parent of the child; or a parent of the child's siblings, if all are living in the same household.

    Dependent Care Costs; Deduction and Coverage: 461-160-0040

    Providers must agree to these things:

    Principle-based outcome

    Children of employed clients and clients in the JOBS program are cared for in safe, stable and dependable child care that supports the child's development. Clients and child care providers understand the payment system, which results in clients paying the provider the copay, and providers receiving agency payment promptly.


  7. Teen focal point; teen parents

    Principle-based decision

    Teen parents complete high school or obtain their GED, and then become employed as soon as possible.

    • Teen parents do not have a subsequent pregnancy;

    • Teen parents live in a safe environment;

    • Teens have healthy infants.

    F SEE SEE FAMILY ISSUES FOCAL POINT; PREGNANT WOMEN AND WOMEN WITH INFANTS, IN THIS WORKER GUIDE (CM-WG#1.12).

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Legal considerations

    Child abuse must be reported to Child Welfare.

    If the pregnancy is a result of criminal acts including rape, incest, abuse and exploitation, report to law enforcement and work towards prosecution of predators. It is illegal for a person of any age to have sexual intercourse with a person under age 16, and those who are mentally defective, mentally incapacitated or physically helpless. It is illegal for a person over 18 to have sexual intercourse with a person under age 18. Nonconsensual sexual intercourse is illegal.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    DHS participates in the Governor's Teen Pregnancy Prevention, Oregon Action Agenda~1997.

    Narrative/data entry

    Narrate: Living situation.

    Eligibility

    Teen parents must live with their parents, legal guardian or adult relative unless it is a case management decision that this is unsafe or impractical.

    If a teen parent returns to live with their parents and the parents' deemed income is over the income standard, the teen may continue to be eligible for medical coverage and JOBS support service payments. For this to happen, the teen must either be in high-school-level classes full time or participate with JOBS, or other program to develop employment or self-sufficiency skills.

    F SEE TANF SECTION J (TF-J) FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT TANF ELIGIBILITY FOR MINOR PARENTS.

    Principle-based outcome

    Teen parents:

    • Have healthy infants;

    • Reside in safe living situations;

    • Have no subsequent pregnancy;

    • Become employed as soon as possible after completing their high-school-level education;

    • Know the importance of assuming responsibility for personal choices;

    • Understand short- and long-term consequences of safe, risky and harmful behaviors;

    • Know communication strategies for avoiding potentially harmful situations; i.e., refusal skills and resistance to peer pressure;

    • Know how to access community agencies that advocate for healthy individuals and families.


  8. Teen focal point; nonparent teens on OHP/SNAP not living with their parents

    Principle-based decision

    Teens receive services to stabilize their living situation, enable them to complete their education and become employed.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Legal considerations

    Youth can be emancipated from their parents at age 16. Consider whether this might be appropriate.

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: Work status codes.

    Coding on FSMIS: Work status codes.

    Principle-based outcome

    Teens:

    • Become employed as soon as possible after completing their high-school-level education;

    • Know the importance of assuming responsibility for personal choices;

    • Understand short- and long-term consequences of safe, risky and harmful behaviors;

    • Know communication strategies for avoiding potentially harmful situations; i.e., refusal skills and resistance to peer pressure;

    • Know how to access community agencies that advocate for healthy individuals and families.


  9. Family issue focal points; domestic violence

    Principle-based decision

    Clients with domestic violence issues become employed without jeopardizing their safety or the safety of their children.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Legal considerations

    State law requires DHS to screen clients for domestic violence, and do community staffings and individualized family plans.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    Believe her; listen; do not minimize the violence; validate her feelings.

    Clients are not responsible for the abuse they receive, but they are accountable for engaging in activities to move themselves toward self-sufficiency within the parameters of agency policy, taking safety concerns into consideration.

    If the abuser is present, do not discuss or offer the items listed under Tools. The abuser may renew the violent behavior when the woman does job search or becomes employed. Anger management classes and family counseling are not considered appropriate treatment for abusers.

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: Program code "E2" on a new case. Use "DVS" Need/Resource code on new and currently open program 2, 82, P2 and M5 cases with the first month of eligibility. Use Special Pay reason 22 on 437 issuances.

    Coding on TRACS: Code waivers related to domestic violence on TRACS. Refer to TANF Section L (TF-L) for detailed information.

    Use "DV" activity code when clients participate in activities directly related to Domestic Violence Intervention.

    Narrate: If there are safety concerns about the narration on domestic violence, you may put the narration on a separate sheet of paper which can be easily removed if it is appropriate for non-DHS staff individuals' review of case file.

    Eligibility

    No verification of domestic violence is required. Accept the client's statement.

    Eligibility requirements may be waived temporarily for TANF if those requirements make it more difficult for individuals to escape domestic violence or place them at risk of further, future violence. See policy for exceptions to the waiver regarding citizenship, income and resources.

    Principle-based outcome

    Clients who have domestic violence issues are employed and are at minimal risk of future abuse.


  10. Family issues focal point; alcohol and drugs

    Principle-based decision

    Clients with alcohol and drug problems will have their chemical dependency identified, receive appropriate treatment and become employed as soon as possible.

    F SEE THE FAMILY ISSUES FOCAL POINT; HEALTH ISSUES (PHYSICAL, MENTAL, INTELLECTUAL) IN THIS WORKER GUIDE (CM-WG#1.11).

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Documentation:   Administrative Medical Examination/Report Authorization (DMAP 729); Comprehensive Psychiatric or Psychological Evaluation (DMAP 729A); Report on Eye Examination (DMAP 729C); Medical Record Checklist (DMAP 729D); Physical Residual Function Capacity Report (DMAP 729E); Mental Residual Function Capacity Report (DMAP 729F).

    Releases:   Authorization for Use and Disclosure of Information (MSC 2099).

    Legal considerations

    A&D providers may have their own release of information forms.

    Some medical documents may have "Not for further release" stamped on them. If so, this means you cannot give copies of these documents to any other agency or person. Other agencies or persons will need to obtain the documents directly from the original source.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    It is not acceptable to pay fines for traffic tickets, directly or indirectly. It is acceptable to advise the client about contacting the probation officer and judge about alternatives to paying the fines.

    Narrative/Data entry

    Coding on CMS: Medical review date, work status codes.

    Coding on TRACS: Record DA on TRACS, update attendance.

    Coding on FSMIS: Work status codes.

    Narrate: Results of evaluations, who did it, the date done; do tickler for dates progress is to be evaluated, dates for expiration of doctor's notes, date treatment will be completed, expiration dates for release of information forms.

    Eligibility

    Recipients of TANF must participate in substance abuse diagnostic, counseling and treatment programs if this is necessary for the individual to be able to work. Failure to cooperate with this requirement can result in the individual's disqualification for JOBS mandatory clients. For JOBS exempt clients, cooperation with the requirement is an eligibility requirement for TANF.

    F SEE SECTION M.21 OF THE TANF CHAPTER (TF-M.21) FOR MORE INFORMATION.

    Principle-based outcome

    Employed clients with resolved chemical dependency problems, who are able to maintain long-term employment.


  11. Family issues focal point; health issues (physical, mental, intellectual)

    Principle-based decision

    Clients who are able to work, even though they have health problems, seek employment. Whenever possible, clients participate in employment preparation activities concurrently with taking steps to resolve their health problems.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    General (and physical)

    Intellectual functioning

    Mental health

    Needed in home to care for child/spouse with disabilities

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Documentation: Administrative Medical Examination/Report Authorization (DMAP 729); Comprehensive Psychiatric or Psychological Evaluation (DMAP 729A); Report on Eye Examination (DMAP 729C); Medical Record Checklist (DMAP 729D); Physical Residual Function Capacity Report (DMAP 729E); Mental Residual Function Capacity Report (DMAP 729F).

    Computer screens: BEIN (information on SSI, SSD, SSB, & Medicare, and appeal of SSA denial of benefits)
    WQTR (# of quarters paid into SSA system; also see TPQY, F23 from BEIN)
    VCLQ (identifies OVRS clients, their OVRS counselor, disability diagnosis, OVRS plan status & employment information).

    Referrals: JOBS Referral for Services (DHS 7841), Disability Referral (SDS 708).

    Releases: Authorization for Use and Disclosure of Information (MSC 2099).

    Legal considerations

    For most medical providers, a release of information form will need to be signed by the client for the case manager or Disability Liaison to receive medical documents.

    Be cognizant about the confidentiality rules pertaining to HIV and AIDS.

    Some medical documents may have "Not for further release" stamped on them. If so, this means you cannot give copies of these documents to any other agency or person. Other agencies or persons will need to obtain the documents directly from the original source.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    It is important not to assume that a client who has health problems cannot work.

    Medical documentation must include the following items to be useful for case management planning or eligibility determination:

    • Description of the health problem (diagnosis);

    • Testing and evaluation results, why the doctor thinks the client has a health problem (clinical findings, psychological or psychiatric evaluations or testing x-ray reports);

    • What treatment or other things the doctor thinks will improve the health condition (treatment plan);

    • What the time frames are for the treatment to be effective or the condition to be fixed;

    • What the doctor thinks the prospects are for improvement (prognosis);

    • How the condition affects the client's ability to work;

    • What limitations has the doctor placed on the client regarding lifting, walking, sitting, etc.

    Medical documentation is acceptable only from medical and osteopathic doctors, optometrists, and licensed psychologists and psychiatrists. For casework planning purposes only, documentation is acceptable from licensed social workers, licensed physical therapists and licensed occupational therapists.

    For ABAWDs only, documentation from any medical practitioner is acceptable, and need not contain the depth of information required by other programs.

    Clients with back problems need to be evaluated by an orthopedist. Clients with mental health problems need to be evaluated by a psychologist or psychiatrist, not a general practitioner.

    A good resource for interpretation of medical reports is your Disabilities Liaison.

    For the Spousal Pay Program, the care giver is paid to care for the dependent spouse with disabilities if the spouse with disabilities needs help with four out of six activities of daily living: eating, dressing/grooming, bathing/personal hygiene, mobility, bowel/bladder management, and cognition (and behavior). An assessment of the level of care is determined, and a service plan is created. The amount of pay is based on the level of care needed by the spouse with disabilities. Examples of disabilities requiring spousal care are: cancer, Lou Gehrig's disease, MS, CP.

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: SSI and Incap case descriptors, medical review date, work status codes.

    Coding on TRACS: Record health related activities (MH, ME, SS) on TRACS.

    Coding on FSMIS: Work status codes.

    Narrate: Results of medical evaluations, who did it, the date done; do tickler for dates progress is to be evaluated, dates for expiration of doctor's notes, treatment will be completed, expiration dates for release of information forms.

    Note:  Managed Care Health Plans will continue to remail the member handbook to the client as long as the post office puts a forwarding address on the envelope. Absent a forwarding address, the health care plan will send the item to the branch.

    Eligibility

    Recipients of TANF must participate in mental health and/or substance abuse diagnostic, counseling and treatment programs if this is necessary for the individual to be able to work. Failure to cooperate with this requirement can result in the individual's disqualification for JOBS mandatory clients. For JOBS exempt clients, cooperation with the requirement is an eligibility requirement for TANF.

    To meet the incapacity deprivation requirement for TANF, one parent must have a medical condition that is expected to last 30 days from the date of request for TANF. The condition must substantially reduce or eliminate the parent's ability to support or care for their children.

    F FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT DEPRIVATION BASED ON INCAPACITY, SEE TANF-F.5.

    Principle-based outcome

    Clients with health problems go to work as soon as is practical.

    • For some, this means rehabilitation occurs first;

    • For others, it means pursuing SSI/SSD if they appear likely to meet the program's criteria;

    • For clients caring for dependents with disabilities, it means receiving agency help in exploring alterative care and resources and engaging in employment preparation activities unless this creates a hardship for the family.


  12. Family issues focal point; pregnant women and women with infants

    Principle-based decision

    Pregnant women and women with infants become employed as soon as possible.

    • Pregnant women give birth to healthy infants;

    • Pregnant women and women with infants prepare for employment by making satisfactory child care arrangements and taking care of the children's basic health needs;

    • Women are encouraged and supported in their efforts to breast-feed their infants, including after they become employed. Infants who are breast-fed for the first year of life will experience health, nutritional and developmental benefits. An employed mother of a breast-fed infant will miss fewer days of work because her infant will be healthier.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Legal considerations

    Report child abuse to Child Welfare;

    It is illegal to discriminate against pregnant women in hiring practices;

    All state agencies are directed to institute practices supporting breast-feeding mothers. (Executive order EO-99-10, signed by Governor John Kitzhaber June 24, 1999.);

    A woman may breast-feed her infant in public. (Senate Bill 744, signed into law on June 24, 1999.)

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    Even though women in their ninth month of pregnancy and those within six months after the baby's birth cannot be disqualified, they can be encouraged to use this time to take advantage of appropriate activities to prepare for employment, parenting or other family stability activities.

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: JOBS exempt status for the ninth month of pregnancy and the first six months of the baby's life if the client elects to take the exemption for clients 20 and over, and 16 weeks for clients 19 and under.

    Coding on TRACS: Put PT if appropriate on TRACS.

    Coding on FSMIS: Work status.

    Eligibility

    There are limitations on the amount of JOBS activities that can be required of pregnant clients in the seventh and eighth month of pregnancy if they are age 20 or older.

    The following groups are exempt from disqualification for noncooperation with JOBS: pregnant women age 20 and older, who are in their ninth month; and clients 20 and older during the six months after giving birth. Clients under age 20 for 16 weeks after the birth of their child.

    F SEE SECTIONS M.2 (TF-M.2) AND 3 (TF-M.3) OF THE TANF CHAPTER.

    Principle-based outcome

    Pregnant women and women with healthy infants, who have resolved their child care and health issues, become employed as soon as possible.


  13. Family issues focal point; youth/child issues

    Principle-based decision

    Youth/child issues (education, juvenile justice, Child Welfare) are effectively resolved so that clients will be able to become employed and retain employment.

    F SEE "CHILDREN LIVING WITH ADULTS WHO ARE NOT RECEIVING CASH BENEFITS" IN DETERMINING THE APPROPRIATE FOCAL POINT OF CASE MANAGEMENT IN THIS WORKER GUIDE (CM-WG#1.2).

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Eligibility

    Youth who are not attending school regularly must participate in JOBS;

    Children who are 18 years old are not eligible for cash assistance unless they are attending high school full time.

    Principle-based outcome

    Employed clients have their children's issues regarding education, juvenile justice and Child Welfare resolved to the point that these issues do not interfere with employment;

    Women who are breast-feeding their infants are encouraged and supported in their efforts and become employed as soon as possible.


  14. Family issues focal point; noncustodial parents

    Principle-based decision

    Noncustodial parents become employed in order to pay child support. Noncustodial parents become a meaningful contributor to their child's upbringing, absent safety issues.

    F SEE THE WORK STATUS FOCAL POINTS EARLIER IN THIS SECTION, (CM-WG #1.3), (CM-WG #1.4), (CM-WG #1.5) AND (CM-WG #1.6).

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Development of plan

    Tools

    Brochure: District 6 has a brochure inviting noncustodial parents to participate in their program. This could be customized for other districts.

    Legal considerations

    Check with DCS regarding child support requirements;

    Be aware of confidentiality issues regarding the release of information on child support and paternity.

    Ethical boundaries/cautions

    Be alert to safety concerns on behalf of the noncustodial parent's family (domestic violence issues).

    Narrative/data entry

    Coding on CMS: Put E in the JOBS status field; use the WTW case descriptor if the parent meets the welfare to work criteria or is a participant in the District 5 and 6 obligor JOBS program.

    Coding on TRACS: Put Y in the Obligor field on TRACS.

    Coding on FSMIS: Appropriate ABAWD/OFSET coding.

    Narrate: Noncustodial parent's needs, visitation issues, child support issues including when payment began, modification of support order.

    Eligibility

    OHP should be explored for A&D and mental health services. If eligible for food benefits, explore ABAWD/OFSET for support service payments. Noncustodial parents are eligible for JOBS support service payments. (Use OFSET payments only if JOBS cannot be used.)

    Principle-based outcome

    Noncustodial parents become employed and pay child support as soon as possible. Noncustodial parents are a positive factor in their children's lives.


  15. Family issues focal point; housing

    Principle-based decision

    Clients with stable housing are more likely to find and maintain employment.

    Assessment

    Possible questions

    Staffing

    Brokering

    Resources

    Resources for associated issues

    Development of plan

    Principle based-outcome


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