Release 87:  Effective October 1, 2017

TANF -
C.  Eligibility Determination Groups


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In the TANF eligibility determination process, DHS must examine:

In order to make this happen, there are five "eligibility groups"; i.e., groups that define who in the household is considered in the eligibility determination process.

  1. Household group
  2. Individuals in a landlord relationship in which the tenant is billed by the landlord, or the landlord and tenant live independently from one another in the same residence, are not considered to be in the same household as the landlord. This also applies to situations in which the tenant has and uses sleeping, bathroom and kitchen facilities separate from the landlord, or the individual is residing in facilities that are in a commercial establishment that provide room or board or both for compensation at fair market value.

    For individuals that are homeless, the household group consists of the individuals who consider themselves to be living together.

    Individuals living in multiple household groups in one month

    Individuals who live in more than one household group during a calendar month are members of the household group in which they spend more than half of their time, except as follows:

    NOTE
      An award by a court of joint (50/50) legal custody does not, by itself, mean a child does not meet the definition of household group member.

    Example 1:

    Mom and child applying for TANF. Dad does not live in the home but sleeps there three nights a week. Since dad is sleeping in the child’s home more than 30 percent of the time (or at least nine nights), he is considered part of the household group.

    Example 2: Dad and child are applying for TANF. The child’s mother visits the child every school day for two hours after the child comes home from school. Dad and child would be considered in the household; however, mom would not be considered in the household.

    Example 3: Kevin lives with his grandmother and grandfather, who currently receive a NNCR grant. Kevin’s biological mother, Tiffany, moves in along with her other son Justin. Tiffany is currently receiving a TANF grant for herself and Justin.

    Tiffany does not have care, control, and supervision of Kevin.  The family will need to determine which grant will be most beneficial.  The family is deciding whether Kevin’s grandparents keep the NNCR grant or Tiffany keeps her grant with Justin.

    The NNCR grant:
    Because Tiffany is in the home she would be included in the filing group with her child, Kevin’s brother, Justin.  Tiffany is included in the financial group and her income would also count against the NNCR grant.


    Tiffany’s TANF grant:
    Because Kevin is Tiffany’s biological son and Justin’s brother he is included in the filing group.  Any income he receives would be counted.  He would not be in the benefit group because Tiffany is not considered to be the caretaker for Kevin.

    Individuals gone for 30 days or more

    Individuals are in the same household even if they are gone for 30 days or more and one of the following is true:

    Example 4: Mom and child are applying for TANF. Dad does not live in the home, but sleeps there three times a week. Since dad is sleeping in the child’s home more than 30 percent of the time, he is considered part of the household group.

    Example 5:

    Dad is applying for TANF. His son is in foster care but documentation from his child welfare worker shows that the son will be returned in two weeks. Since the child is expected to be returned within 30 days, he is part of the household group. (He will not be added to the benefit group until his foster care payments ends and he is returned to his dad.)

    Example 6:

    A mother is applying for TANF for herself and her child. She is recently divorced. The divorce settlement states the child has 50 percent visitation with both parents. A divorce settlement, child custody order or other parenting agreement cannot solely be used to determine where a child is residing. A conversation with the mother must be had about the actual visitation of the child as well as who has primary care, control and supervision. After the conversation, it is determined that the child lives 50 percent of the time in the home of each parent; the child is not considered part of the TANF household group.

    Example 7:

    A parent provides documentation indicating they will be in treatment an additional 45 day: DHS would approve the individual for a 60-day extension since the first 30-day extension would expire. Additional documentation would not be necessary under this circumstance. This could include other in-patient addiction services as well, for example, gambling addiction or eating disorder treatment.

    Example 8: Andy and Mary apply for TANF for themselves and their child Molly. The family is homeless. Mary and Molly are living in a homeless shelter. Due to the facility’s policies, Andy is not allowed to stay in the shelter. For up to 60 days, we would consider the family a two-parent household.

    Example 9: In the previous example, Mary and Molly are still living in the shelter after 60 days. On a case-by-case basis, we could consider a 30-day extension to keep Andy in the household.

    Household Group Rule
    461-110-0210 — Household Group

    No adult cases ‑ adjusted household group

    When there is no adult in the benefit group (e.g., no “AD” on the grant), benefits are based on the adjusted number in the household group compared to the number in the benefit group.

    In no-adult TANF cases, the adjusted number in the household is determined by taking the total number of individuals in the household, minus the following individuals (unless they are included in the benefit group):

    Example 10:

    Grandma is applying for a non-needy caretaker relative grant for her grandson. Grandma also lives with her husband and a foster child. The foster child is not included in the adjusted household group for the benefit calculation.

    Prorated Standards; Adjusted Number in Household Rule
    461-155-0020 — Prorated Standards; Adjusted Number in Household

    Correctional facilities

    The following people are considered living in correctional facilities. They are not household members and are not eligible for benefits:

    NOTE
      People on parole or long-term leave (30 days or more) from a correctional facility and people under house arrest are not considered living in a correctional facility. If they are living in the same household as the applicants, they are considered a household member and may be eligible for benefits if they meet all eligibility requirements.

    NOTE
      If a household group member becomes incarcerated, only remove the person if they are anticipated to be gone for more than 30 days.

    Eligibility for Inmates and Residents of State Hospitals Rule
    461-135-0950 — Eligibility for Inmates and Residents of State Hospitals

  3. Filing group
  4. The filing group is all the individuals from the household group whose circumstances are considered in the eligibility determination process. The filing group consists of people from the household group who choose to apply for benefits and who meet nonfinancial eligibility requirements; AND people who must apply for benefits because of their relationship to those people.

    If the filing group does not include at least one applicant who meets all nonfinancial eligibility requirements, the group is ineligible.

    Applicants must provide any information or verification needed to determine who must be in the filing group.

    When a household member is in more than one filing group for the same program, the filing groups must be combined, unless specified otherwise in administrative rule.

    Filing Group; Overview Rule
    461-110-0310 — Filing Group; Overview

    Verification; General Rule
    461-115-0610 — Verification; General

    Who must apply together?

    The following household group members must be in the filing group:

    Who is not in the filing group?

    The following individuals are excluded from the filing group:

    A caretaker relative who does not meet the definition of a parent of the dependent child may apply for TANF as a needy or non-needy caretaker, if they are given the care, control and supervision of the child. Needy caretaker relatives must meet all eligibility requirements to qualify. Non-needy caretaker relatives must only meet income eligibility requirements to qualify.

    Example 11:

    A mother has three children. Two of the children are from a previous marriage, but the third is by her current boyfriend who does not live with her. She wants to apply for TANF for herself and her oldest children but not for the youngest child because she does not want to pursue the boyfriend for child support. All three children must be included in the filing group with the mother because they are blood-related siblings.

    Example 12:

    A man and a woman apply for TANF. She has two children by a previous relationship but they have a child in common. They must all be in the filing group together for TANF because the blood-related siblings cannot be separated from one another and the parents cannot be separated from the children.

    NOTE
      In order to be considered a caretaker relative, they must have care, control and supervision of a dependent child. A dependent child cannot be a parent at the same time. The family would need to determine who has care, control and supervisions of the dependent children. (See section J.4 (TF-j.4) for minor parents turning 18.).

    Example 13:

    Gina, age 17, is applying for TANF for herself and her 2-month-old son, Charles. They currently live with her dad, Jonas.

    Option 1: If Jonas has care, control, and supervision of both Gina and Charles, Jonas will be included in their filing group.

    Option 2: If Gina is considered the caretaker relative, having sole care, control, and supervision of Charles, she can apply for herself and her child without her father Jonas. Income from Jonas would be deemed and applied to the grant. (See M.3 for deeming instructions.)

    NOTE
      The definitions of legally married, marriage, parent and spouse changed as of January 1, 2014. These definitions are changed in order to recognize same-sex marriages from states, districts, territories or countries where same-sex marriage is legal.

    Would the marriage need to be verified? To be eligible for benefits, individuals must provide verification when the department requests verification (see OAR 461-115-0610). If the information provided is questionable, ask for verification.

    Definitions for Chapter 461 Rule
    461-001-0000 — Definitions for Chapter 461

    Filing Group; TANF Rule
    461-110-0330 — Filing Group; TANF

    Pregnant women

    For pregnant women who have no other children to be eligible, the pregnancy must have reached the first of the calendar month prior to the month in which the due date falls.

    Example 14: Jillian is due on April 8. The calendar month prior to the due date of her pregnancy would begin in March. We would look at the first of the month, which in this case would be March 1.

    For filing groups in which the only eligible child is an unborn, the father of the unborn must be in the filing group if he is in the household with the mother.

    If there is another dependent child in the household, the father of the unborn is included in the filing group, even when the mother’s pregnancy has not reached the calendar month before the month in which the due date falls.

    NOTE
     

    Pregnancy Calendar

    Month

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    9
    (Potentially eligible the first of this month, if all requirements are met, and no other child in the home

    Month Due Date Falls

    Trimester

    1st

    2nd

    3rd

     

    JOBS Status

    *JOBS eligible

    10 hours JOBS

    JOBS exempt

     

    *Unless meets a reason for JOBS Exemption.

    NOTE
      When the pregnant woman is at risk of or has a safety concern due to domestic violence, the worker may waive the requirement for her to have reached the first of the calendar month prior to the month in which the due date falls.

    Example 15:

    A pregnant mother is applying for TANF for herself and her two children. The father of the unborn child resides in the home with her. The mother, children and father of the unborn must be in the filing group together.

    Caretaker relatives and children on duplicate TANF cases

    If a needy caretaker relative applies for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and meets all eligibility requirements except that their dependent child received benefits on another case, the caretaker relative may receive TANF for themselves while the dependent children are removed from the other case. The child(ren) may not receive TANF on both cases.

    Prior to issuing TANF for the caretaker relative, it must be determined that the child is in the caretaker relative’s household and must meet all other eligibility requirements.

    Children are considered in the household, filing and financial groups on the new case.

    They are not in the need group as they do not meet all nonfinancial requirements due to duplicate benefits. Since they are in the financial group, their income and resources count towards eligibility and the benefit allotment.

    Example 16:

    Sheila applies for TANF, establishing her filing date on May 15 for her two children. She clears all other eligibility as of May 17. The children are currently receiving TANF on their father John’s case. Sheila’s worker does not find this questionable as John has already reported that the children have left his household. John’s worker sends a 10-day notice to close his TANF case May 31. Sheila may receive TANF for herself starting May 15. Her children are added to the case effective June 1.

    Example 17:

    On May 25, Marcus applies for TANF for himself and his daughter, Bethany, who is receiving TANF on a non-needy caretaker relative grant with her grandmother. This report is considered questionable as Marcus had previously reported having his daughter in his care when he did not. The worker pends for verification that his child lives with him. This is received May 31. The grandmother’s worker sends a 10-day notice removing Bethany from the TANF case, effective June 30. Marcus receives TANF for himself only for May 31 through June 30. Bethany is added July 1.

    Example 18:

    Tracy applies for TANF for her son Brody on May 16. It is not questionable as it is confirmed by Tracy’s child welfare worker. Brody is currently receiving TANF on his aunt’s case. Brody also receives $150 per month in SSB benefits. A 10-day notice is sent removing Brody from his aunt’s case effective May 31. The SSB counts against Tracy’s TANF grant which is opened effective May 16.

    Example 19:

    On August 2, Jonas applies for TANF for himself and his two children. It is not questionable that the children are in Jonas’ care as he has primary custody during the school year. His two children are currently receiving TANF on their mother’s case in California. The worker in California is closing TANF for the children August 30. Jonas may receive TANF through the end of August on his own. His children will be added to his case effective September 1.

    Filing Group; TANF Rule
    461-110-0330 — Filing Group; TANF

    Specific Requirements; TANF Rule
    461-135-0070 — Specific Requirements; TANF

    Concurrent and Duplicate Program Benefits Rule
    461-165-0330 — Concurrent and Duplicate Program Benefits

  5. Financial group
  6. The financial group is individuals from the filing group whose income and resources count in determining eligibility and benefits.

    The TANF financial group consists of all the people in the filing group except:

    Example 20:

    A mother of two children is receiving a Social Security check each month. Part of the check is SSB but the other part is SSI. The mother’s SSB would not count toward the children’s TANF grant because, due to the SSI, she is not in the financial group and none of her income is counted for TANF.

    Example 21:

    A father receives TANF for himself and one of his children but has another child who is on SSI. The children have different mothers. The child who receives SSI also received child support from her mother. The child support does not count toward the TANF grant of the father and the other child.

    Example 22:

    A mother receives TANF for herself and her two children. The father of the youngest child stays with the family on Friday, Saturday and Sunday of each week. The father is in the household group. He is also required to be in the filing and financial groups. His income is counted against the TANF grant for the entire family.

    Example 23:

    A grandmother is applying for TANF for her two grandchildren as a non-needy caretaker relative. The grandmother’s spouse and their two minor children also live in the household. The grandmother, spouse, their two children and the two relative children are all included in the financial group. The combined countable income must be less than the countable income limit standard for six in the filing group. If not, the entire caretaker relative filing group is ineligible. If the income is less than the standard, the dependent relative children must also have income below the “no-adult countable income limit” for the need group to be eligible.

    NOTE
      Income for minor parent families is dependent upon how the filing group is determined. The family determines who has care, control and supervision of the dependent children.

    Example 24: Gina, age 17, is applying for TANF for herself and her 2-month-old son, Charles. They currently live with her dad, Jonas.

    Option 1: If Jonas has care, control and supervision of both Gina and Charles, they will all be in the filing and financial groups, and income for all three will be considered when determining eligibility for TANF.

    Option 2: If Gina is considered the caretaker relative, having sole care, control, and supervision of Charles, she can apply for herself and her child without her father Jonas. Gina and Charles are in the financial group, but income is deemed from Jonas and applied against the TANF grant as Gina is a minor parent. (See M.3 (TF-m.3) for deeming instructions.) .

    Financial Group Rule
    461-110-0530 — Financial Group

  7. Need group
  8. The TANF need group consists of individuals from the financial group whose basic and special needs are used in determining eligibility and benefit level.

    The TANF need group consists of the financial group members except as follows:

    Example 25: A mother of two children is applying for TANF. She does not want to get TANF for one child as she does not want to pursue child support. The mother can choose not to apply for TANF for the child. The child is required to be in the household, filing, financial and need group, but would not be in the benefit group. She would not be required to pursue support, but if she was receiving support for that child, it would be used in determining eligibility and benefit amount.

    Need Group Rule
    461-110-0630 — Need Group

    Citizenship and Alien Status Requirements Rule
    461-120-0110 — Citizenship and Alien Status Requirements

  9. Benefit group
  10. The benefit group is the people from the need group who receive benefits.

    For TANF, the benefit group consists of the people from the need group who:

    Except the following:

    Example 26: A grandmother receives a non-needy caretaker relative TANF grant for her grandchild. The child’s mother is not allowed to have care, control or supervision of the child by order of Child Welfare. As part of her rehabilitation, the child’s mother is ordered by the court to live with her mother. The child’s mother would be in the household group, filing group, financial group (income she is receiving would count against the child’s grant) and need group. The child’s mother would not be in the benefit group because she does not meet all nonfinancial eligibility factors (she is not a caretaker relative). Therefore, the grandmother could potentially continue to receive benefits for the grandchild.

    Benefit Group Rule
    461-110-0750 — Benefit Group

  11. TANF eligibility group examples
  12. The following TANF case scenarios are to assist in identifying who are in respective TANF eligibility groups.

    Unborn child examples

    Example 27:

    A woman in her ninth month of pregnancy is living with the father of the unborn child. Neither have any other dependent children.

    • Household - Mom, alleged father, unborn;
    • Filing - Mom, alleged father, unborn;
    • Financial - Mom, alleged father, unborn;
    • Need - Mom, alleged father;
    • Benefit - Mom, alleged father.
    The mother and the alleged father of the unborn are living together. Both claim the alleged father is, in fact, the father (no other man has been identified as the father). Because both of these individuals are a parent of the unborn child, both must be included in the filing group. Since the pregnancy has reached the calendar month before the due date month, both parents are in the benefit group and receive TANF.

    Example 28:

    A woman in her third month of pregnancy is living with the father of the unborn.  She also has a child from a previous relationship.

    • Household ‑ Mom, mom’s child, father of unborn, unborn:
    • Filing ‑ Mom, mom’s child, father of unborn, unborn;
    • Financial ‑ Mom, mom’s child, father of unborn, unborn;
    • Need ‑ Mom, mom’s child, father of unborn;
    • Benefit ‑ Mom, mom’s child, father of unborn
    In addition to the explanation in example 1, because of the relationship of the individuals in the household (mom is a parent to her child and a parent to the unborn, father is a parent to the unborn), all are included in the filing group. Although mom’s pregnancy has not reached the ninth month, because there is another dependent child in the filing group, the father of the unborn is included in the benefit group along with mom and mom’s child, regardless of the month of pregnancy of the mom.

    Example 29:

    A woman is in her ninth month of pregnancy. She does not live with the father of the unborn, but they are a “couple” and see each other every day. Once the baby is born, the father plans to be very involved in the child’s life.

    • Household - Mom, unborn;
    • Filing - Mom, unborn;
    • Financial - Mom, unborn;
    • Need - Mom;
    • Benefit - Mom.
    Because mom and the father of the unborn do not live together and have no other eligible dependent children, the father is not considered in the household (e.g. he does not live in the dwelling and there are no other children to consider deprivation).

    NOTE
      Once the baby is born, the case worker would need to consider the involvement of the father.If the father is sleeping 30 percent of the time or nine times a month in the home, he is considered to be in the same household and they would need to apply together.

    Blended family examples

    Example 30:

    Mom, mom’s child, boyfriend (PWE) and their common child. The boyfriend voluntarily quit a full-time job without good cause 1 month ago. They are all applying for TANF together.

    • Household - Mom, boyfriend, mom’s child, common child;
    • Filing - Mom, boyfriend, mom’s child, common child;
    • Financial - Mom, boyfriend, mom’s child, common child;
    • Need - No eligible persons;
    • Benefit - No eligible persons.
    Because of relationship of the individuals(mom is a parent to mom’s child; mom’s child is a half-sibling to the common child; boyfriend is a parent of the common child), all are included in the filing group. Since boyfriend (who is in the need group) quit a full-time job without good cause, this family is ineligible for TANF.

    Example 31:

    Mom, dad (married), mom’s child, common child. The dad is working full time. Mom is applying for TANF for herself and her child.

    • Household ‑ Mom, dad, mom’s child, common child:
    • Filing ‑ Mom, dad, mom’s child, common child;
    • Financial ‑ Mom, dad, mom’s child, common child;
    • Need ‑ Mom, dad, mom’s child, common child;
    • Benefit ‑No eligible person.
    Because of relationship of the individuals (mom is a parent to mom’s child; mom’s child is a half-sibling to the common child; dad is a parent of the common child. and step-parent to mom’s child), all are included in the filing group. Because dad is working full-time, this family is over the income limit to receive TANF.

    Child Welfare/child in foster care examples

    Example 32:

    Mom, her child, two unrelated foster children in her care.

    • Household - Mom, her child, two foster children;
    • Filing - Mom, her child;
    • Financial - Mom, her child;
    • Need - Mom, her child;
    • Benefit - Mom, her child.
    Since the two children are in foster care and are unrelated, they are not part of the filing group. Mom and her child would be in the need and benefit group as they meet all eligibility requirements.

    Example 33:

    Mom, her only child who is in foster care but will return to the household within the next 30 days.

    • Household ‑ Mom, child:
    • Filing ‑ Mom, child;
    • Financial ‑ Mom, child;
    • Need ‑ Mom;
    • Benefit ‑ Mom.
    Because the child in foster care will be returned to the home in the next 30 days, the child is considered part of the household. The child also remains in the filing and financial groups. The child is not in the need group as he or she is in foster care. Mom is eligible for TANF as her only child is in foster care but expected to return in the next 30 days.

    Adopted children examples

    Example 34:

    Mom, her biological child, and adopted child (not receiving adoption assistance).

    • Household - Mom, biological child, adopted child;
    • Filing - Mom, biological child, adopted child;
    • Financial - Mom, biological child, adopted child;
    • Need - Mom, biological child, adopted child;
    • Benefit - Mom, biological child, adopted child.
    Because the adopted child is NOT receiving adoption assistance, the adopted child remains in the filing group. Everyone meets all eligibility requirements and are in the need and benefit groups.

    Example 35:

    Mom, her two adopted children (both receiving adoption assistance).

    • Household ‑ Mom, her two adopted children:
    • Filing ‑ No eligible person;
    • Financial ‑ No eligible person;
    • Need ‑ No eligible person;
    • Benefit ‑ No eligible person.
    Because the children are receiving adoption assistance, they are not considered part of the filing group. In order for the mom to be eligible for TANF, she must have an eligible dependent child or unborn in her filing group. Since the children are not in the filing group, the mom is ineligible for TANF.

    Non-needy caretaker relative examples

    Example 36:

    Aunt, uncle, their minor child and niece. Only requesting benefits for niece.

    • Household - Aunt, uncle, their minor child, niece;
    • Filing - Aunt, uncle, their minor child, niece;
    • Financial - Niece;
    • Need - Niece;
    • Benefit - Niece.
    Because aunt, uncle, and their minor child are not requesting benefits and have income less than 185 percent of the non-needy caretaker relative countable income limit, they are not in the financial group. The niece remains in the need and benefit group as she meets all eligibility requirements.

    Example 37:

    Grandma, grandson, granddaughter (cousin to other grandson). She is only requesting TANF for grandson.

    • Household ‑ Grandma, grandson, granddaughter:
    • Filing ‑ Grandma, grandson;
    • Financial ‑ Grandson;
    • Need ‑ Grandson;
    • Benefit ‑ Grandson.
    Since grandma is not requesting benefits for the granddaughter and the granddaughter is not a sibling to the grandson, the granddaughter is not in the filing group. Also, because grandma is not requesting benefits for herself and has income less than the non-needy caretaker relative countable income limit, she is not in the financial group. The grandson remains in the need and benefit group as she meets all eligibility requirements.

    Example 38: Great-grandma, great-grandson, great-granddaughter (second cousin to other great-grandson). She is only requesting TANF for great-grandson.

    Household – Great-grandma, great-grandson, great-granddaughter;

    Filing – Great-grandma, great-grandson;

    Financial – Great-grandson;

    Need – Great-grandson;

    Benefit – Great-grandson.

    Since great-grandma is not requesting benefits for the great-granddaughter and the great-granddaughter is not a sibling to the great-grandson, the great-granddaughter is not in the filing group. Also, because great-grandma is not requesting benefits for herself and has income less than the non-needy caretaker relative countable income limit, she is not in the financial group. The great-grandson remains in the need and benefit group as she meets all eligibility requirements.

    SSI recipient examples

    Example 39:

    Mom who receives SSI, child.

    • Household - Mom, child;
    • Filing - Mom, child;
    • Financial - Child;
    • Need - Child;
    • Benefit - Child.
    Because the mom receives SSI, she is not in the financial group. The child remains in the in the need and benefit group because he or she meets all eligibility requirements.

    Example 40:

    Mom, dad and child who receives SSI.

    • Household ‑ Mom, dad, child;
    • Filing ‑ Mom, dad, child;
    • Financial ‑ Mom, dad;
    • Need ‑ Mom, dad;
    • Benefit ‑ Mom, dad.
    Because the child receives SSI, he or she is not in the financial group. The mom and dad remain in the financial need and benefit group as they meet all eligibility requirements.

    Example 41:

    Mom who receives SSI and SSDI and child.

    • Household ‑ Mom, child;
    • Filing ‑ Mom, child;
    • Financial ‑ Child;
    • Need ‑ Child;
    • Benefit ‑ Child.
    Because the mom receives SSI, she is not part of the financial group. Since she is not part of the financial group, none of her income, including her SSDI, counts. The child remains in the financial, need and benefit groups as he or she meets all eligibility requirements.

    Noncitizen examples

    Example 42:

    Mom who is an ineligible noncitizen, dad, child.

    • Household - Mom, dad, child;
    • Filing - Mom, dad, child;
    • Financial - Mom, dad, child;
    • Need - Mom, dad, child;
    • Benefit - Dad, child.
    Because of their relationship, mom, dad and child care in the filing, financial and need group. Mom falls out at the benefit group as she does not meet the citizenship and alien requirements, and therefore, does not meet all nonfinancial requirements.

    NOTE
      Since mom is in the need group, she is required to complete an employability screening (DHS 7823A).

    Example 43:

    Mom who is an ineligible noncitizen, at risk of harm due to domestic violence and pregnant in the fourth month.

    • Household ‑ Mom, unborn;
    • Filing ‑ Mom, unborn;
    • Financial ‑ Mom, unborn;
    • Need ‑ Mom;
    • Benefit ‑ Mom.
    Since mom is at risk of harm due to domestic violence, the requirement to meet citizenship requirements and to be in the month prior to her due date can be waived. Since she meets all other requirements, she would be TANF eligible.

    Minor parent examples

    In the following examples, the terms ‘major mom” and “major dad” refer to a minor parent’s mother or father.

    Example 45:

    Major mom, minor parent, minor parent’s child, sibling of minor parent. Major mom is requesting TANF for everyone, and has care, control and supervision of the minor parent's child.

    • Household ‑ Major mom, minor parent, minor parent’s child, sibling of minor parent;
    • Filing ‑ Major mom, minor parent, minor parent’s child, sibling of minor parent;
    • Financial ‑ Major mom, minor parent, minor parent’s child, sibling of minor parent;
    • Need ‑ Major mom, minor parent, minor parent’s child, sibling of minor parent;
    • Benefit ‑ Major mom, minor parent, minor parent’s child, sibling of minor parent.
    Since major mom is requesting TANF for the minor parent, the minor parent cannot be a separate filing group than major mom.

    Example 46:

    Gina, age 17, is applying for TANF for herself and her 2-month-old son, Charles. They currently live with her dad, Jonas.

    Option 1: If Jonas has care, control and supervision of both Gina and Charles, they will all be in the filing group.

    Household – Jonas, Gina, Charles;
    Filing – Jonas, Gina and Charles;
    Financial – Jonas, Gina and Charles;
    Need – Jonas, Gina and Charles;
    Benefit – Jonas, Gina and Charles.

    Option 2: If Gina is considered the caretaker relative, having sole care, control and supervision of Charles, she can apply for herself and her child without her father Jonas. Income from Jonas would be deemed and applied to the grant. (See M.3 (TF-m.3) for deeming instructions.)

    Household – Jonas, Gina, Charles;
    Filing – Gina and Charles;
    Financial – Gina and Charles (income deemed from Jonas);
    Need – Gina and Charles;
    Benefit – Gina and Charles


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