Release 88:  January 1, 2018

TANF -
M.  Participation, Cooperation, Re-Engagement


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  1. What is JOBS cooperation?
  2. To receive a full TANF grant, JOBS-eligible participants must cooperate with the activities specified in their case plan. These activities may include pursuing available assets such as child support, alcohol or drug diagnostic appointment or treatment, referrals to OVRS, employment-related activities and domestic violence support groups.

    Cooperation is encouraged through identification of goals, strengths, barriers and resources, development of plans with participants, sharing problem-solving responsibilities with the participant and by helping the participant see the need for change.

    Participants who are JOBS-eligible to cooperate with JOBS activities must provide enough information so that the Department of Human Services (DHS) can determine the appropriate level of JOBS program participation.

    They must also accept a bona fide offer of employment, whether it is temporary, permanent, full time or seasonal. Once they are employed, participants must maintain employment.

    DHS will support cooperation by informing participants about any support services or programs that can help the participant reach their goals.

    It is important that a participant cooperates with the activities specified in their case plan. Continued noncooperation may lead to TANF grant reduction.

    PARTICIPANT COOPERATION
      DHS must consider information from any screening and/or evaluation in determining whether the participant is able to cooperate the appropriate cooperation level of each participant.

    General Provisions; Employment Programs Rule
    461-130-0305 — General Provisions; Employment Programs

    Specific Requirements; SFPSS Eligibility Rule
    461-135-1195 — Specific Requirements; SFPSS Eligibility

  3. Who must cooperate with the JOBS program?
  4. A caretaker relative of a dependent child or unborn is eligible for JOBS participation if they:

    Noncitizens who receive TANF or whose children receive TANF are required to prepare for or pursue employment if they can legally work in the United States.

    Example 1: Leonard is receiving TANF. His only child is on SSI. Since they are in the same filing group and Leonard does not meet any JOBS exemptions per section 3; Leonard is JOBS-eligible.

    Example 2: Sheldon and Amy are on TANF together. There are no children in the home but Amy is pregnant and due next month. Amy is JOBS-exempt per section 3 but Sheldon does not meet any JOBS exemptions in section 3 and is considered JOBS-eligible.

    Example 3: Howard is an ineligible noncitizen on a TANF case with his children. He is not receiving TANF but is eligible to work in the United States. Since Howard is work eligible and does not meet any of the JOBS exemptions in section 3, he is JOBS-eligible.

    Example 4: Bernadette is serving an IPV disqualification, but receives TANF for her children. She is not otherwise JOBS-exempt, nor does she meet any exemptions in section 3 and is considered JOBS-eligible.

    Example 5: Brandon applies for TANF for his two children, but does not wish to receive TANF for himself. He does not meet any of the JOBS exemptions in section 3: he is JOBS-eligible.

    Participants with physical or mental disabilities are not JOBS-exempt from JOBS program requirements. Per the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), all participants must have access to JOBS activities and support services as long as accommodating them does not fundamentally alter the purpose or intent of the JOBS activity in which they would participate.

    Example 6: Raj is on TANF with his child. He has a disability, but not receiving SSI. He is able to work and participate in the JOBS program. Since he does not meet any of the JOBS exemptions in section 3, he is JOBS-eligible.

    All participants must cooperate in determining appropriate JOBS activities. This includes providing information and documentation to support JOBS-exempt status or good cause for modified JOBS participation hours.

    Refugees within their first 12 months in the U.S. who live in the New Arrival Employment Service (NAES) project area must participate and follow the NAES employment program rules.

    ADULTS IN THE STATE FAMILY PRE-SSI PROGRAM
      Adults in the State Family Pre-SSI program, including both adults in a two-parent household, are not subject to JOBS participation requirements. Once a family enters into the SFPSS program, they are no longer considered to be TANF families. They are not subject to JOBS participation requirements or TANF time limits.

    General Provisions; Employment Programs Rule
    461-130-0305 — General Provisions; Employment Programs

    Filing Group; TANF Rule
    461-110-0330— Filing Group; TANF

    Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer Rule
    461-130-0310— Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer

  5. Who is considered JOBS-exempt from the employment program?
  6. The following participants are JOBS-exempt from JOBS participation and disqualification:

    A JOBS exemption identified with ** must be verified by a licensed or certified professional that is qualified to determine the condition or circumstance. A JOBS exemption cannot be given until verification is received.

    PARENT WITH CHILD SIX MONTHS OLD – JOBS PROGRAM VOLUNTEER
      A parent with a child under six months old may volunteer for the JOBS Program and request support services, based on local budget. As JOBS volunteers, these individuals would not be subject to disqualification.

    PARENT WITH CHILD SIX MONTHS OLD – JOBS PROGRAM VOLUNTEER
      A parent with a child under six months old may volunteer for the JOBS Program and request support services, based on a local budget.

    JOBS VOLUNTEER CLARIFICATIONS
      Only one parent may be a JOBS volunteer for the six months following a dependent child’s birth.

    Participants experiencing DV-related safety issues or concerns are not considered JOBS-exempt from participation.

    Example 7:

    Steve receives TANF for his nephew and himself. He is not otherwiseJOBS-exempt from participation. Since he is a needy caretaker relative of a child who receives TANF, he is considered JOBS-exempt.

    Example 8:

    Dylan and Brenda apply for TANF with their 2-month-old baby. They both want to stay home with their new baby. Only one parent may remain home with the child for the first six months. They must choose which parent will participate in JOBS and which one will be considered a JOBS volunteer.

    Example 9:

    Jason and Jackie apply for TANF with their three children. Jason has several documented disabilities and needs assistance from Jackie. DHS sends the DHS 7785 to Jason’s doctor, who returns to form to the department. According to the form, Jackie is needed to care for Jason. Jackie is now JOBS-exempt.

    Example 10: John lives in a remote town and currently has ongoing medical issues relating to being on the Oregon transplant list. He has to travel two hours each way to and from weekly doctor appointments. There are limited services available to him and he is not able to gain employment. DHS could exempt John using undue hardship. DHS should first review for SFPSS Program and/or other family stability steps and staff with a policy analyst.

    Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer Rule
    461-130-0310 — Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer

  7. Who can volunteer for the JOBS program?
  8. The following participants from the need group are JOBS volunteers, and are not subject to disqualification, if they choose to participate in the JOBS program and meet at least one of the current state exemptions verified by a licensed or certified professional that is qualified to determine the circumstance:

  9. Changing status from a JOBS volunteer to JOBS-eligible
  10. When a JOBSs volunteer’s status changes from JOBS-exempt to JOBS-eligible, DHS cannot impose a grant reduction for noncooperation while the participant was JOBS-exempt.

    It is important for the DHS branch office to explain how the participant’s JOBS status has changed and there are new requirements.

    DHS also needs to do the following:

    Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer Rule
    461-130-0310 — Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer

  11. Noncooperation in JOBS program
  12. Noncooperation exists when a JOBS-eligible participant fails to complete the activities as specified on their case plan without good cause.

    Additionally, participants in the JOBS program are considered not cooperating if they fail to do the following without good cause:

    Requirements for Mandatory Employment Program Individuals; Pre-TANF, REF,
    SNAP, TANF Rule
    461-130-0315 — Requirements for Mandatory Employment Program Individuals; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF

    Good Cause Rule
    461-130-0327 — Good Cause

    Noncooperation with JOBS and domestic violence

    If a survivor of domestic violence fails to cooperate with JOBS activities, offer the opportunity for re-engagement. At the re-engagement appointment, determine whether the noncooperation was a result of domestic violence.

    If the domestic violence affected the participant in a way that made it unsafe for them to participate or if they were otherwise affected by the domestic violence (e.g., court appointments, did not receive notices, abuser sabotaged the participant’s participation, etc.), give the participant good cause for noncooperation.

    If the participant failed to cooperate and it was not a result of domestic violence, follow the normal JOBS re-engagement process. Involve the local DV service provider in the re-engagement process or joint staffing with domestic violence survivors whenever possible.

    When domestic violence survivors do not cooperate with assigned JOBS activities that are safe for them to perform, and if the caretaker relative meets the citizen/alien status requirement, DHS should start the re-engagement process.

    Example 12: Billy applies for TA-DVS and is approved. Billy develops an ongoing safety plan to look for housing and meet with a DV advocate for additional services. DHS added both activities to his case plan, including checking in with DHS weekly. Two weeks go by and Billy has not contacted DHS, nor engaged with housing or DV resources. DHS would start the re-engagement process with Billy.

  13. Good cause for noncooperation with the JOBS program
  14. Good cause is what DHS considers a valid reason or circumstance that keeps a participant from cooperating with elements of their case plan. It is the participant’s responsibility to provide evidence to establish good cause for noncooperation and to work with DHS staff to try to resolve problems that interfere with cooperation. It is important to determine whether the participant cannot or will not cooperate with their case plan.

    A JOBS program participant may have good cause for not participating if any of the following is true:

    Good Cause Rule
    461-130-0327 — Good Cause

  15. Good cause for missed appointments
  16. Good cause for missing JOBS Program appointment with DHS, DHS contractor or designee, community service provider as related to the participant’s case plan, or scheduled mental health or alcohol and drug treatment appointments and activities includes:

    GOOD CAUSE
      Good cause for a missed A&D treatment appointment must be granted if an aspect of a disability related to A&D caused the participant to miss the appointment. For example, if memory loss caused by past methamphetamine use caused the participant to miss an appointment, good cause must be granted. However, workers are not required to grant good cause when a participant reports they missed an appointment because they were using alcohol or drugs at the time.

    Good Cause Rule
    461-130-0327 — Good Cause

  17. Good cause when the participants meet federal participation requirements
  18. Good cause is granted when a participant meets the following federal participation requirements even though they may not have completed all the hours agreed to in their case plan:

    Example 13: Liam is a single parent to a child under 6. His plan is for 26 hours of core activities. He only completes 21 hours. Since he has completed 20 hours a week he is granted good cause for not completing the remainder of his hours.

    Example 14: Annie is a single parent to a child under 6. Her child has special needs and she needs a provider that can accommodate them. There are no providers in her area that can meet these needs. Since she is unable to obtain child care, she is granted good cause.

  19. What is re-engagement?
  20. Re-engagement (OAR 461-190-0231) is a process intended to encourage participants to fully participate in case plan activities. The re-engagement process is initiated when a concern related to the plan or participation in the plan has arisen.

    The re-engagement process provides an opportunity for the department to understand what may be preventing a participant from engaging in services and to allow the participant an opportunity to engage in a plan that meets their goals and family needs.

    The re-engagement process can be initiated by the participant, DHS, DHS contractor or a community partner. It is a team approach to attempt and engage the JOBS-eligible participant in JOBS-related activities. The team is composed of the participant, DHS representatives and other persons (e.g., DHS contractor representative, neutral third party, etc.) related to the case plan or family goals.

    It can be conducted face-to-face meeting or over the phone.

    The outcome of the re-engagement appointment must be clearly narrated.

    The re-engagement process is intended to:

  21. When does the re-engagement start?
  22. Re-engagement begins when the participant misses a planned activity or appointment or stops participating in an ongoing planned activity.

    Activities could include, but are not limited to:

    Once the department has determined a participant has become noncooperative in their ongoing case plan, the department must make contact to determine good cause.

    If good cause is determined and the department is able to engage the participant, the re-engagement process stops.

    If good cause is not determined or the department is unable to engage the participant in JOBS activities, the re-engagement process continues.

  23. Scheduling re-engagement appointment/staffing
  24. The department must provide the participant with timely written notice of JOBS re-engagement appointment so they can make arrangements or request accommodations timely to insure engagement in services.

    The department must mail notice of a formal re-engage JOBS appointment using the JOBS Re-engagement Notice (DHS 7869). The notice is required to be mailed no less than seven calendar days prior to the appointment. A copy of the notices can be delivered during a home visit, but this does not replace the mailing of the notification requirement.

    NOTE
      It is possible that the conversation during the home visit may lead to engagement of the participant which may end the re-engagement process.

    The department must add re-engagement (RE) step to TRACS

    The re-engagement (RE) step is used to track re-engagement outcomes. It allows a “data point” to compare re-engagement outcomes.

    OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE
      Before a disqualification may be applied, the participant must have had the opportunity to participate in the re-engagement process (OAR 461‑190‑0231). Mail a re-engagement appointment letter offering an opportunity to participate in the process. Give the participant enough time between delivery of the re-engagement letter and the appointment date in order for them to make arrangements to attend.

  25. Re-engagement appointment/staffing
  26. The re-engagement appointment provides the participants an opportunity to share what has changed in their situation and what is preventing engagement. The re-engagement staffing is intended to give the department a structured process of reviewing for possible limitations or obstacles that could be preventing engagement, provide resources, and encourage engagement in servicess.

    During the re-engagement appointment, the department must provide participants with:

    The department works with the participant to re- evaluate the appropriateness of current plan activities and modify the plan based on the participant’s goals, strengths, barriers and resources. Support participants in making informed decisions regarding program requirements, expectations and consequences for noncooperation.

    The re-engagement appointment should:

    When all needed information is available at the time of the re-engagement appointment, the case review will take place at the same time. When all needed information is not available at the time of the re-engagement appointment, the department must follow up on all needed information before making a determination

    Things to keep in mind:

    Example 15: Jimmy has a pattern of low attendance in his SW activity; worker schedules him for a re-engagement appointment. Jimmy attends his re-engagement appointment and explains his situation, which includes reasons why he has not been able to fully participate, to is worker. His worker explains the re-engagement process, how Jimmy got to this point and what could happen next. Jimmy agrees to engage fully and his case plan is updated. Worker then provides this information to the re-engagement staffing team which makes a determination to grant good cause for the noncooperation.

    Example 16: Sam did not attend her JOBS appointment; worker schedules her for a re-engagement appointment. Sam attends her re-engagement group appointment. Information about program requirements and community resources are shared with the group. Sam meets with the staffing team and provides information about her noncooperation. The re-engagement staffing team makes a determination of no good cause for noncooperation. A department designee meets with Sam and updates her case plan and she starts her two weeks participation to avoid a grant reduction.

  27. Case review/staffing
  28. Case review and staffing gives the department time to e nsure understanding of the participant’s situation. It allows time to collect needed information required in the re-engagement process prior to making a team determination.

    When all needed information is available at the time of the re-engagement appointment, the case review will take place at the same time . When all needed information is not available at the time of the re-engagement appointment, the department must follow up on all needed information before making a determination.

    During the re-engagement process the department must review:

    Offer any screenings that have not been completed or determine whether an updated or further screening/assessment might be needed (e.g., A&D/MH screening, Learning Needs screening, Domestic Violence screening or Physical Health Needs screening):

    If a screening is refused, use the DHS TANF/JOBS Program Client Rights – Screenings and Evaluations form (DHS 7826) in addition to TRACS to document the refusal.

    Example 18: Linda was invited to a re-engagement appointment where her case was staffed with the re-engagement team. Linda did not attend her re-engagement appointment. At the staffing, the team reviewed available DHS testing screens. Screens indicate that Linda had been referred to additional services for AD with a local provider, per narration. It is unknown to the department if she engaged in such services. At the time of the staffing, the team determined that services had been offered by the department and to move forward with a grant reduction. The team can move forward with imposing grant reduction as the possible AD barrier was considered, resource provided at the time of contact, and to the best of the departments understanding of the case treatment was determined to not be a factor in her noncooperation.

    Example 19: Arial was invited to a re-engagement appointment were her case was staffed with the re-engagement team. Arial did not attend her re-engagement appointment. At the staffing, the team reviewed available DHS disability screens. Screens indicate that Arial has a documented back injury that prevents her from standing or sitting too long. Arial had agreed to engage in SW services with contractor. Contractor was aware of her accommodation needs and able to provide them. Arial stopped attending SW classes and did not notify the worker or contractor. The team reviewed and narrated they considered her disability in determining her noncooperation in JOBS services. The team can move forward with grant reduction as at re-engagement staffing her disability was considered and determined not to be a factor in her noncooperation.

    GAINS/LEARNING NEEDS SCREENINGS
      GAIN and Learning Needs Screenings should only be administered by department staff or designees that have met department training requirements and who are comfortable and capable of administering said screenings.

    These tools should be administered one-on-one between a participant and department staff or designee with appropriate follow up provided by the department at time of screening.

    When reviewing for ongoing safety concerns look back six months in the case record. Each potential safety incidence must be determined individually as a factor or not a factor in the participant’s noncooperation.

    Information from community partners (e.g., domestic violence service providers, community action agencies, housing, etc.) or other agencies with which the participant may be working, etc., should be used to determine if the participant’s safety risk directly prevented them from participating in the JOBS program requirements.

    Example 20: Lilian had been in a DV situation five months prior to her DQ staffing. She had been approved for DV funds and the department helped her move to safe housing. She then stopped engaging in JOBS services and was invited to re-engagement. The Team determined that her safety needs had been addressed with DV funds and was not a factor in her noncooperation in the JOBS program. The DQ would be upheld in this situation as the team acknowledged, determined and narrated that safety was not a factor in her noncooperation.

    Example 21: It was known to the agency that Martha moved from Washington State to Oregon to get away from an unsafe living situation with her ex-partner. She has never been approved for DV services in Oregon and there is no coding on her case. Staffing team moves forward with grant reduction without addressing potential safety concerns. DQ would be imposed in error as safety concerns known to the agency were not addressed.

    ** If the agency had addressed the known safety concerns and determined they did not factor in her noncooperation and clearly narrated such, they could have imposed the grant sanction .

    DV AND PARTICIPATION
     

    Participants currently involved in ongoing domestic violence regardless of whether they have an open DV grant are JOBS-eligible.

    They should be engaged in services that meet their safety needs and do not put them at further safety risk.  These services could include family stability services such as housing and safety planning with an advocate.  They could also include full or modified employment readiness services based on their safety needs.

  29. Department determination/staffing outcomes
  30. The department must make a determination based on all the information gathered during the re-engagement process of whether the participant does or does not have good cause for noncooperation in planned activities.

    In TRACS, clearly document the situation that led to the request for re-engagement, including:

    Good cause determination

    The local re-engagement team determines the participant had good cause for noncooperation:

    Things to consider while determining good cause:

    No Good cause determination grant reduction

    The local re-engagement team determines the participant did not have good cause for noncooperation.

    No Good cause determination no grant reduction

    The local re-engagement team determines the participant did not have good cause for noncooperation but is not imposing a grant sanction.

    Re-engagement; JOBS, Pre-TANF, REF Employment Program, SFPSS, TA-DVS Rule
    461-190-0231 — Re-engagement; JOBS, Pre-TANF, REF Employment Program, SFPSS, TA-DVS

    Disqualifications; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF Rule
    461-130-0330 — Disqualifications; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF

  31. When does the re-engagement process end?
  32. The re-engagement process ends when any of the following are met:

  33. Who can be disqualified from the JOBS program?
  34. Individuals who are JOBS-eligible and required to cooperate with the activities specified on their case plan and who fail to cooperate without good cause are subject to disqualification/grant sanction.

    JOBS disqualifications are applied independently to any JOBS-eligible individuals who do not cooperate in JOBS program requirements. In multi-parent households, more than one adult can be disqualified if the individual adults do not cooperate in JOBS program requirements.

    Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer Rule
    461-130-0310 —Participation Classifications: Exempt, Mandatory, and Volunteer

  35. JOBS disqualification grant reduction
  36. Grant reductions for noncooperation with the JOBS program requirements are progressive. They are as follows:

    When a disqualified participant does not act to end the disqualification, it progresses to the next level the following month.

    REAPPLYING A DQ4
      When DHS is re-engaging a participant who has a history of a DQ4 (the Case Descriptor on UCMS). If the team decides the participant did not have good cause, the DQ4 would be reapplied. This will give the participant one month to begin the two-week cooperation period before the TANF case is closed and a DQR is applied.

    Disqualifications; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF Rule
    461-130-0330 — Disqualifications; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF

  37. When is a JOBS disqualification ended?
  38. The JOBS disqualification process is ended when:

    Example 22:

    Erin is on an active disqualification. She comes into the office on 3/3 and signs a case plan to start participation. On 3/17, she completes her two weeks of participation per her case plan (PDP).

    The disqualification ends on 3/17, DQ need resource removed, and TANF grant supplemented, effective 3/1.

    Example 23: Lisa is on an active disqualification that has continued to roll to a DQ3. Lisa provides her worker with pregnancy verification and is due next month.

    Lisa is now JOBS-exempt from participation and disqualification. The department would end the current disqualification and supllement the grant back to the first day of the month prior to the month of her due date.) The department would also roll DQ history back to a DQ2.

    Example 24: Amber is on an active disqualification that has continued to roll. She comes into her local DHS office and discloses to her worker that she has been living with an abusive partner and does not wish to apply for DV service. She states that she and her children have since moved in with her mother. The department reviews her case and, per her statements, determine that at the time she was re-engaged for not attending her JOBS appointment, her partner was controlling her ability to leave the house. The department determines that at the time she missed the activity that lead to re-engagement, she was unable to participate due to DV.

    The department would engage Amber in JOBS services and overturn the DQ, supplement the grant back to the start of the DQ and remove the DQ history from the case.

    Example 25: Jacklyn is on an active disqualification that has continued to roll. She comes into the office and applies for DV services. She states that with her grant reduction, she moved in with her boyfriend who started hurting her. She is working with a DV advocate and he has moved out. The department reviews her case and, per her statements, the DV did not occur until after she was noncooperative in the JOBS program. There is no indication that during re-engagement, Jacklyn had an ongoing safety concern.

    The department would engage Jacklyn in JOBS services as appropriate based on her safety needs and stop the DQ effective the date the department was informed of the new safety concern. The DQ history would stay on Jacklynís case.

    Example 26: Sharon and Ken are both JOBS-eligible adults in a multi-parent TANF household. Sharon is currently on an active disqualification. Ken comes into the office on 5/12 and signs a case plan to start participation. On 5/26, he completes his two weeks of participation per his case plan (PDP).

    The family grant reduction ends and the TANF grant supplemented, effective 5/26. The DQ history (C/D) stays under Sharon, as she is the individual that became disqualified, resulting in the grant reduction.

    COOPERATION
      The department must provide the participant an opportunity to engage within 48 hours of the participant requesting to engage in services.

    The department or JOBS contractor cannot delay the participantís ability to start participation at the time the participant signs the updated case plan.

    Removing Disqualifications and Effect on Benefits Rule
    461-130-0335 — Removing Disqualifications and Effect on Benefits

    Domestic violence Rule
    461-135-1200 — Domestic violence

  39. Effective date for ending a disqualification
  40. A participant or JOBS-eligible adult in the need group who informs the department they intend to cooperate in JOBS activities must:

    The disqualification ends after the participant completes two consecutive weeks of cooperation:

  41. Requirements to cooperation with alcohol and drug or mental health treatment
  42. A participant identified by a qualified medical professional as needing mental health or alcohol and drug treatment must cooperate and follow through with the referral and the treatment program requirements.

    Use the following penalties (MQ1 – MQ4) when an adult member or parenting teen in the need group is JOBS-exempt from JOBS disqualification but is required to participate in alcohol and drug or mental health treatment. See section 3 above for more information on who is considered JOBS-exempt from participation.

    Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties; Pre-TANF, REF, TANF Rule
    461-135-0085 — Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties; Pre-TANF, REF, TANF

  43. Good cause for noncooperation with alcohol and drug or mental health treatment
  44. There is no good cause for not pursuing treatment unless treatment services are unavailable to the participant at no cost. However, participants may have good cause for missing scheduled appointments or activities because of the circumstances specified under item 11, above. Also, good cause exists if a domestic violence victim fails to cooperate with a treatment plan when the batterer is also receiving treatment from the same provider.

  45. Penalties for noncooperation with alcohol and drug or mental health treatment
  46. Penalties for not cooperating with alcohol and drug or mental health treatment program requirements are progressive. The re-engagement process as outlined above is used to determine that the participant refused to particpate in their agreed-upon activities without good cause. The penalties for failing to cooperate with treatment are as follows:

    DQS AND MQS
      DQs and MQs do not transfer to each other. If a participant is at an MQ1 and becomes JOBS-eligible, the MQ would be ended and the department would begin the re-engagement process for a JOBS-eligible participant.

    If a participant who is exempt from JOBS participation loses that exemption while serving a disqualification for Alcohol & Drug/Mental Health noncooperation, the participant continues in the Alcohol & Drug/Mental Health disqualification until they cooperate.

    Example 27: Last month Joanne was not cooperating with the requirement for her to attend alcohol and drug treatment. At the time her child was under six months of age.  The case worker tried to re-engage Joanne but the local team determined she was refusing to participate without good cause and applied a disqualification. Joanne had an MQ1 added to her Needs Resource on her case.

    Multiple Disqualifications; TANF Rule
    461-135-0200 — Multiple Disqualifications; TANF

    Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties; Pre-TANF, TANF Rule
    461-135-0085 — Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties; Pre-TANF, TANF

    Demonstrating Compliance with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Requirements;
    Restoring Cash Benefits; Pre-TANF, TANF Rule
    461-135-0089 — Demonstrating Compliance with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Requirements; Restoring Cash Benefits; Pre-TANF, TANF

  47. When does an alcohol and drug or mental health treatment disqualification end?
  48. A disqualification for alcohol and drug/mental health treatment ends when:

    Example 28: Liz is on an active disqualification (MQ2). Liz had been JOBS-exempt from JOBS participation and disqualification during the first six months after the birth of her child. Her exemption ends at the end of this month.

    Liz is no longer JOBS-exempt from JOBS program participation. The MQ2 would be removed from the Needs Resource however it would remain in the Case Descriptor.

    The case manager would discuss the change in participation status and develop a new plan if needed. If Liz fails to participate, a new re-engagement process would begin. If the staffing team determines Liz did not have good cause a DQ would be applied. Remember to send timely reduction notice.

  49. Effective date for ending a drug and alcohol/mental health disqualification
  50. A disqualified participant, who informs the department they intend to cooperate in drug and alcohol or mental health services must:

    The disqualification ends after the participant completes two consecutive weeks of cooperation:

    For all levels of penalty, if an appropriate activity is not available within two consecutive weeks or there is a cost to the participant, a participant's statement of intent to cooperate will serve as the demonstration of cooperation.

    Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties;  Pre-TANF, TANF Rule
    461-135-0085 — Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties;  Pre-TANF, TANF

    Demonstrating Compliance with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Requirements; Restoring Case Benefits; Pre-TANF, TANF Rule
    461-135-0089 — Demonstrating Compliance with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Requirements; Restoring Case Benefits; Pre-TANF, TANF

    Example 29: Yolanda had been determined noncompliant in mental health activities. Her disqualification will be applied on the first of the following month. Yolanda does not contact her worker until the fifth. The disqualification has already taken effect. She wants to re-engage in treatment. Yolanda and her worker develop a new plan. She begins her two-week cooperation period on the seventh of the month. She completes the two-consecutive week requirement on the 21st of the month.

    Yolanda’s grant would be restored effective the 21st of the month. This is the day she completed her two weeks of cooperation.

  51. Counting the disqualification/noncooperation penalty months
  52. A JOBS disqualification or penalty for failure to cooperate with substance abuse / mental health treatment are counted for any month which:

    Disqualifications; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF Rule
    461-130-0030 — Disqualifications; Pre-TANF, REF, SNAP, TANF

    Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties; Pre-TANF, TANF Rule
    461-135-0085 — Requirement to Attend an Assessment or Evaluation, or Seek Medically Appropriate Treatment for Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Disqualification and Penalties; Pre-TANF, TANF

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