Release 75:  October 1, 2014

SNAP -
C.  Eligibility Determination Groups


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  1. Household group

    People who live in the same dwelling are in the same household. A dwelling is defined as living space, separate from other dwellings that have access to the outside that does not pass through another dwelling, and contains a sleeping area, bathroom and kitchen facility.

    For example: A house is two separate dwellings when it is divided into two separate identified apartments and each contains its own entrance from outside, bedroom, kitchen and bath area.

    F SEE HOUSEHOLD GROUP EXAMPLES (SNAP-C - EXAMPLES 1).

    Persons residing in each of these dwellings are considered their own household. If a child (under the age of 22) lives in a separate dwelling from their parents (GP-A.60), they are two separate household groups. In this situation, the parents and child will not be placed in the same filing group (SNAP-C.2) because they are not in the same household.

    For homeless (GP-A.41) groups, the household is the people who consider themselves living together.

    F SEE SNAP-J.4 FOR A LIST OF HOMELESS SHELTERS CERTIFIED TO ACCEPT SNAP IN PAYMENT FOR PREPARED MEALS.

    When people live in more than one household during a calendar month, consider them in the household where they eat at least 51 percent of their meals.

    When children live in shared custody situations, unless there is a dispute about the custody/meals arrangement, there is no need to question the person applying for the child. You may accept their statement regarding household composition. If the child is on another SNAP case, send an appropriate notice to remove the child from the other case. However, if there is then a dispute about the child, it must be determined whose household they receive the majority of their meals from. Determine the number of the 21 meals the child receives in each home each month. The parent whose house the child leaves to go to school that morning receives credit for breakfast and lunch.

    F SEE HOUSEHOLD GROUP EXAMPLES (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 1).

    Exception: Residents of domestic violence shelters (GP-A.25 ) or safe homes (GP‑A.70) can be in both the household they just left and the household they are in the month they enter the shelter. Please visit https://aix-xweb1p.state.or.us/es_xweb/DomesticViolence/ to help determine whether or not the person is in an approved shelter. If you have questions about a shelter that is not listed, please contact the SNAP Policy Unit.

    F SEE SNAP-H.7 AND IB-A.29 REGARDING ISSUING BENEFITS TO CLIENTS RESIDING IN DV SHELTERS OR SAFE HOMES.

    In addition, people gone from the household for 30 days or more are no longer in the household.

    F SEE SNAP-I.5 FOR POLICY ON WHEN A PERSON IS INCARCERATED.

    Household Group: 461-110-0210


  2. Filing group; overview

    After determining who is in the household, determine who is in the filing group. The filing group is the people who live together whose circumstances are considered in determining eligibility.

    Filing Group; Overview: 461-110-0310


  3. Filing group; most situations

    The filing group is the people in the household who:

    When all people living together purchase or prepare meals together they are all in the same filing group, unless they meet an exception in SNAP-C.4.

    F SEE SNAP-J.3 FOR INFORMATION ON WHO MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR SNAP WHEN MEALS ARE PROVIDED.

    Additionally, some people who live together must be in the same filing group, even if they purchase and prepare their food separately. These people are:

    Definitions for Chapter 461: 461-001-0000

    F SEE FILING GROUP EXAMPLES (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 3).

    For everyone else, the filing group is all the people in the household, except for people who purchase and prepare their food separately.

    Residents of commercial boarding houses cannot be in the filing group. However, the manager/owner of a commercial boarding house and their filing group can apply separately from the resident boarders.

    Higher education students that do not meet the criteria to be an eligible student (SNAP-E.3) cannot be in the filing group. Only higher education students who meet this special criteria or who are under age 18 or age 50 or older can be included in the filing group. Higher education students residing in dorms or other group college living situations with meal plans are not eligible for SNAP in separate filing groups.

    Eligible and Ineligible Students; SNAP: 461-135-0570

    F SEE EXAMPLES OF FILING GROUPS INELIGIBLE STUDENT #7 (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 3).

    F SEE SNAP-E.3 FOR MORE ON HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTS.

    A person who received SNAP benefits in the month of application in another benefit group is excluded from the new filing group. They can be excluded for a maximum of two months, if necessary, due to notice requirements, unless the person was head of household in the other case. Even if the HH received SNAP in another state, this is considered an ongoing case. If the person received SNAP this month as head of household, deny benefits for the entire filing group.

    F SEE SNAP-G.17 FOR HOW TO TREAT PERSONS RECEIVING CALIFORNIA SSI.

    Note:  A person that is not included in the filing group, will not have their income included in the groups countable income. If a person drops out of the filing group, they are not included in the financial, need or benefit groups.

    Filing Group; Overview: 461-110-0310
    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370


  4. Filing group; special living arrangements

    F SEE SNAP-J.3 FOR MORE ON SITUATIONS WHERE MEALS ARE PROVIDED.

    Drug/Alcohol treatment centers (A&D) or Residential Care Facilities (RCF). Residents in drug/alcohol treatment centers or residential care facilities (GP-A.15) are not eligible for SNAP benefits when the facility provides the meals unless the facility is certified by the state.

    If the facility is not state certified, the facility cannot apply for the client. In this instance, the client must have cooking facilities available for personal use and be responsible for at least 51 percent of their own meals to be eligible for SNAP benefits.

    Certified A&D: In order for residents of drug/alcohol treatment facilities to be eligible for SNAP benefits, the facility must be certified through the State of Oregon Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program. All residents must apply through an authorized representative (SNAP-B.14) who is an employee of the facility. An employee of the facility must sign the application. Each resident forms their own filing group unless they are parents and children under age 22. Parents with children under age 22 form one filing group.

    F SEE SNAP-WG #2.1 FOR MORE ON CLIENTS LIVING IN AN A&D TREATMENT CENTER.

    F SEE SNAP-J.4 FOR A LIST OF A&D TREATMENT CENTERS WITH POINT-OF-SALE DEVICES.

    Residents of Institutions; SNAP: 461-135-0510

    Certified RCF: Residents of an RCF can receive benefits only if all the following are true:

    The certified facility may apply for the residents as an authorized representative or the facility may decide that the resident is able to apply on their own. Each resident forms their own filing group. When the RCF residents do not have an employee of the facility as their authorized representative, form the filing groups according to the bullets in SNAP-C.3.

    Note:  If the certified RCF applies for its residents, it must apply as an authorized representative for each resident and sign the application.

    Note:  DD clients receiving brokerage services are not considered to be residing in an RCF.

    F SEE SNAP-G.25 FOR MORE INFORMATION ON GROUP LIVING ARRANGEMENTS.

    F SEE SNAP-WG #2.2 FOR MORE ON CLIENTS LIVING IN AN RCF.

    F SEE SNAP-J.4 FOR A LIST OF NON-PROFIT MENTAL HEALTH RCFS.

    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370
    Residents of Institutions; SNAP: 461-135-0510
    Residents of Drug Addiction and Alcohol Treatment Facilities; SNAP: 461-135-0550

    Elderly persons who have disabilities. An elderly person (GP-A.27) and their spouse (GP-A.77) (if any) may apply separately from others they live with who purchase and prepare meals for them. This is true only if the elderly person is unable to purchase and prepare their own food because of a severe and permanent disability, and the income of the other household group members managing the food does not exceed this limit:

    Others Living in the Dwelling Monthly Countable Income
    1 $1,605
    2  2,163
    3  2,722
    4  3,280
    5  3,838
    6  4,396
    7  4,955
    8  5,513
    Each additional person     559

    F SEE EXAMPLES OF FILING GROUP; SPECIAL LIVING ARRANGEMENTS ELDERLY #1 AND #2 (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 4).

    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370

    Foster care/guardianship assistance. Persons in foster care (CA-B.29) or receiving guardianship assistance cannot form their own filing group. This is because they are having meals provided as part of their foster care/guardianship assistance, so they do not have a food need.

    The familial relationship ties noted in SNAP-C.3 regarding spouse and child under age 22 are not broken, even when a person is in foster care. If the caregiver applies for benefits, the caregiver can choose to include or exclude the person(s) in foster care/guardianship assistance, their spouse or child under age 22 from the filing group. If the caregiver chooses to include the person(s) in foster care/guardianship assistance in the group along with other people living there, form the filing group according to the bullets in SNAP-C.3.

    For SNAP, treat residents of Adult Foster Care (AFC) (GP-A.15) as follows:

    F SEE SNAP-WG #2.5 FOR MORE ON CLIENTS LIVING IN AN AFC SITUATION.

    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370
    People in Adult Foster Care (AFC) and Boarding Houses; SNAP: 461-135-0530

    F SEE EXAMPLES OF FILING GROUP; SPECIAL LIVING ARRANGEMENTS FOSTER CARE, #3, #4 AND #5 (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 4).

    Note:  Proctor care administered by or under contract to a state agency is a form of foster care. Treat these situations and income the same as foster care.

    Live-in attendants. A live-in attendant is a person living in the household and paid to provide medical, housekeeping or similar personal services for a person with disabilities or elderly (GP-A.27) person. They are not considered a member of the elderly person's or person with disabilities' household unless they are related as specified in the bullets in SNAP-C.3. When live-in attendants are not related as specified in the bullets in SNAP-C.3 to the person they are caring for, they may apply with their minor children (if any) separately from the people for whom they are providing services.

    F SEE EXAMPLES OF FILING GROUP; SPECIAL LIVING ARRANGEMENTS LIVE-IN ATTENDANT #6 (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 4).

    Note:  A paid live-in attendant provides essential supportive services in the client's home; or in the home of a relative or others with whom the client lives; or the client lives with a relative or others who provide paid care services and the living situation does not meet foster care licensing requirements. The services range from assistance with household tasks to assistance with activities of daily living.

    Supportive services may be provided to those individuals who have been assessed by DHS to be in need of a service or whose physician prescribes supportive services.

    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370

    Residents of domestic violence shelters (GP-A.25) or safe homes (GP-A.70). These clients can be in two filing groups the month they enter the shelter, when they recently left a household containing a person who abused them. These clients may receive SNAP benefits twice that month if they: were not issued an Oregon Trail card; are unable to access the benefits; or the original benefits remain in control of the abuser. The two filing groups are the one they just left and the one they are in the month they enter the shelter. Once in the shelter/safe home, residents can choose to apply together or form filing groups according to the bullets in SNAP-C.3.

    F SEE SNAP-H.7 AND IB-A.29 REGARDING ISSUING BENEFITS TO CLIENTS RESIDING IN DV SHELTERS OR SAFE HOMES.

    F SEE SNAP-WG #2.2 AND 2.3 FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CLIENTS LIVING IN DV SHELTERS OR SAFE HOMES.

    Filing Group; Overview: 461-110-0310
    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370

    F SEE EXAMPLES OF FILING GROUP; SPECIAL LIVING ARRANGEMENTS DV SITUATIONS #7 (SNAP C - EXAMPLES 4).

    Institutions. People who reside in an institution that provides them with at least 50 percent of their meals may or may not be eligible for SNAP benefits. It is important to consider the client's circumstances when making a determination.

    People in a general hospital, state institution, intermediate care facility or semi-skilled or skilled nursing facility for 30 days or more are not eligible.

    The following are not considered institutions:

    Residents of Institutions; SNAP: 461-135-0510

    Lodgers. A lodger is someone who pays someone else in the household for their meals. Lodgers cannot form their own filing group. This is because they do not purchase and prepare their meals. However, if their meal provider applies for benefits, the meal provider can choose to include or exclude a lodger paying a reasonable amount from the filing group.

    Lodgers paying less than a reasonable amount for their meals must be in the filing group with the meal provider. The amount they are paying is not reasonable when it is less than the Thrifty Food Plan for themselves and anyone else in their filing group, if they pay for more than two meals a day. It also is not reasonable when it is less than two-thirds of the Thrifty Food Plan for themselves and anyone else in their filing group, if they pay for two or less meals per day.

    Residents of commercial boarding houses are not eligible. A person operating the boarding house and his or her filing group may receive benefits separate from the residents.

    Filing Group; SNAP: 461-110-0370
    People in Adult Foster Care (AFC) and Boarding Houses; SNAP: 461-135-0530
    Lodger Income: 461-145-0340


  5. Financial group

    The financial group consists of all the people in the filing group (SNAP-C.2). Everyone in this group will have their assets (income and resources) looked at to determine whether or not the assets are countable or excluded.

    F SEE COUNTING CLIENT ASSETS FOR MORE INFORMATION.

    Financial Group: 461-110-0530


  6. Need group

    The need group are the people whose basic and special needs are used in determining eligibility.

    The need group consists of all of the financial group (SNAP-C.5) members except any member who:

    F SEE SNAP-E.19 AND GENERIC PROGRAM L (GP-L) FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO DETERMINE ELIGIBILITY AFTER A PERSON HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED AS NOT MEETING THE CONDITIONS OF THEIR PAROLE, PROBATION OR POST-PRISON SUPERVISION.

    F SEE SNAP-G.17 FOR INFORMATION ABOUT HOW TO TREAT A PERSON WHO IS RECEIVING SSI FROM CALIFORNIA.

    Note:  Examples of clients not meeting the nonfinancial requirements are ineligible noncitizens (SNAP-E.5), clients disqualified for failure to meet work requirements (SNAP-E.16), or clients disqualified for refusal to provide an SSN (SNAP-E.6).

    F SEE NEED GROUP EXAMPLES (SNAP-C - EXAMPLES 6).

    Although people are dropped from the need group because of the bulleted reasons above, their income and resources still count. This is because they are still members of the financial group. Individuals who fail to get SNAP benefits for these reasons do not have their needs considered when choosing the payment standard to calculate benefits.

    Need Group: 461-110-0630


  7. Benefit group

    People from the need group (SNAP-C.6) who have resources below the limit and have income below the Income Limits/Payment Standard are in the benefit group and get SNAP.

    If the benefit group does not have at least one eligible person in the benefit group, deny the application.

    Filing Group; Overview: 461-110-0310
    Benefit Group: 461-110-0750


  8. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) C - Eligibility determination groups examples

    Section 1.   Household groups examples

    Example 1: A 20-year-old son, Art, lives in a self-contained camp trailer on his parents' property. He has a bathroom, microwave oven and a small stove in the trailer. He states that he purchases and prepares his own food, and he is applying for SNAP benefits for himself only.

    Forming the group: The son does not need to apply for SNAP benefits with his parents because he is in a separate dwelling where he prepares his own meals. He is living in a household separate from his parents and is therefore eligible to apply for SNAP benefits for himself only.

    Example 2: An 18-year-old son lives in a camp trailer on his parents' property with his girlfriend. They state that they purchase and prepare their meals together. However, because the camp trailer is not equipped for cooking, they cook and eat at his parents' house.

    Forming the group: The son and his girlfriend cannot form their own filing group separate from his parents because they do not have the facility or equipment to prepare their own meals.

    Example 3: A client and her two children live with her husband who is a long-haul truck driver. The husband is on the road three weeks out of every month. He buys his meals on the road. The client and the children want to apply for SNAP benefits separate from the husband.

    Forming the group: The client and her children are separate from the husband. The husband is not included in the household because he eats over 51 percent of his meals elsewhere. However, the portion of his pay he gives to his family counts as unearned income (support).


    Section 3.   Filing group; most situations examples

    Example 1: A pregnant client and her boyfriend (father of her unborn) state they live together, but purchase and prepare food separately. The client wants to apply for SNAP benefits separate from her boyfriend.

    Forming the group: Each adult can be separate for SNAP. When the baby is born, however, the baby must get SNAP with its parents. Therefore, at that time, the three of them will become one SNAP group, even if they continue to purchase and prepare food separately.

    Example 2: A pregnant 19-year-old lives with her parents and 13-year-old brother. She states she purchases and prepares food separately from the rest of the family and wants to apply for separate SNAP.

    Forming the group: The 19-year-old must be part of the one SNAP group that lives together. She is under age 22 and lives in her parents' residence, and therefore is part of their filing group. Even when the baby is born, she and her baby cannot form a separate group from her parents until she turns 22.

    Example 3: An 18-year-old lives in a camp trailer on his friend's property. He states he purchases and prepares his own meals. He cooks and eats his meals at his friend's house because the trailer is not equipped for cooking.

    Forming the group: Even though the 18-year-old is in his friend's household group, he does not need to apply for SNAP with his friend as long as he purchases and prepares his own meals. He can form his own filing group even though he cooks at his friend's house, because his friend is not his parent.

    Example 4: A 19-year-old, her 24-year-old friend and their common child live with her parents. She states that she and her child purchase and prepare food separately from the rest of the household and want to apply for separate SNAP benefits.

    Forming the group: The 19-year-old, 24-year-old and their common child must be part of the same SNAP filing group because the child draws in both parents. The client is under age 22 and she is living with her parents. Therefore, they must all be part of the same filing group. (If the 19-year-old, 24-year-old and child were living with the 24-year-old's parents, they could be in a separate filing group from his parents.)

    Example 5: A 26-year-old woman moved in with her parents. Two of her children (ages 3 and 5) also live with her parents. The parents have guardianship over the young children.

    Forming the group: The 26-year-old cannot be a separate filing group from her two children because they are under the age of 22. The children cannot be a separate filing group from the grandparents because they have parental control, care and supervision. Therefore, the filing group consists of the 26-year-old, her parents and the two children.

    Example 6: Denise, age 12, is on SNAP benefits with her mother. On March 16, she moves in with her father, who applies for benefits for both of them. Although her father may be eligible in March, Denise cannot receive SNAP benefits with him and is excluded from the filing group. Send 10-day notice to Denise's mother to remove her from that case before adding her to her father's filing group.

    Example 7: A married couple purchase and prepare food together and want to apply for SNAP benefits together. One of them is an ineligible student.

    Forming the group: This is one household group, but the ineligible student is excluded from the filing and other groups. Therefore, only the nonstudent can get SNAP benefits, and none of the ineligible student's income or resources count.

    Example 8: Tammy moves in with Tommy, and they are purchasing and preparing their meals together. Tommy wants to apply for SNAP benefits, but Tammy received benefits with her mother this month in Washington.

    Forming the group: Since Tammy was not the head of the household on her mother's case, Tommy can receive benefits this month without Tammy.


    Section 4.   Filing group; special living arrangements examples

    Example 1: Elderly person -

    An elderly person and their spouse live with their daughter (age 21) and her spouse. The couple have disabilities that prevent them from purchasing and preparing their own meals. The couple may form a separate filing group from the daughter and her spouse even though the daughter is under age 22, as long as the daughter and her spouse have countable income below 165 percent FPL. (Income chart is in SNAP-C. 4).

    Example 2: Elderly person -

    A 72-year-old woman lives with her daughter. The woman has temporary disabilities due to a car accident and is unable to purchase and prepare her own meals. She may not form a separate filing group from her daughter because she does not meet the criteria of a severe and permanent disability.

    Example 3: Foster care -

    The household group consists of a person in AFC, his daughter (age 26), her spouse and their two children. The daughter and her husband may apply for SNAP benefits with or without her father. They are all purchasing and preparing meals together but the daughter may exclude her father from the filing group simply because he is getting AFC.

    Example 4: Foster care -

    Elderly parents live with their 27-year-old daughter. The daughter provides foster care for her father. The daughter purchases and prepares food for everyone in the household and wants to apply for SNAP benefits for herself and her mother only.

    Forming the group: The daughter can choose to exclude the person in foster care and his spouse or children under 22 from the group. She can only apply for her mother if she includes her AFC father. So she alone can be a separate SNAP group. Her father and mother, however, cannot be in a separate group because he is in foster care and is ineligible if he applies for himself and spouse.

    Example 5: Foster care -

    The household group consists of a teen in foster care with a newborn and the foster care provider.

    Forming the group: The provider must choose to include or exclude the teen and newborn from the filing group. The newborn cannot receive SNAP benefits without the foster care teen. The foster care teen can only receive SNAP benefits if the provider applies and includes the teen in their filing group.

    Example 6: Live-in attendant -

    The household group consists of a person with disabilities that keep them from doing housekeeping or personal services and they have hired another to live in their home to provide these services. Each may apply for SNAP as separate filing groups as long as they are not required to apply together due to relationship. If the person receiving care provides the majority of the attendant's meals, the attendant cannot apply for SNAP as a separate filing group. If the person receiving care provides the majority of the attendant's meals and the attendant is not in the filing group, the client may also get a medical deduction for the cost of the meals up to a one-person SNAP payment standard.

    Example 7: DV -

    A client and two children fled their home and went to a friend's home to be safe. This client may not get a second SNAP issuance in the month because she did not flee to a DV shelter and is not in a dwelling that meets the definition of a safe home.

    Example 8: A 30-year-old woman lives with her husband and her 52-year-old mother. She does all the grocery shopping, using her mother's money to pay for her mother's own food. The daughter also does all the cooking, preparing separate meals each day for her mother.

    Forming the group: There are two filing groups in this household - the married couple is one; the mother is separate. Even though the daughter does all the shopping and cooking, the food is purchased and prepared separately for the two groups.


    Section 6.   Need group examples

    Example 1: A married couple with 10- and 12-year-old children purchase and prepare food together and want to apply for SNAP together. The mother is an ineligible noncitizen.

    Forming the group: This is one filing group. The mother is excluded from the need and benefit group, because she does not meet the nonfinancial requirement for citizenship. Because she is in the financial group, a prorated share of her income and deductions count.


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